LMM's Cavendish haunts to be declared national historic site

Red roads and beaches; Discuss LMM's home and inspiration
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Timothy
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LMM's Cavendish haunts to be declared national historic site

Post by Timothy » Thu Aug 10, 2006 5:46 am

Green Gables sites protected
Thu, August 10, 2006
By FREE PRESS NEWS SERVICES
CHARLOTTETOWN -- Lands that inspired Anne of Green Gables author Lucy Maud Montgomery are to be declared national historic sites. Senator Don Oliver will be in P.E.I. tomorrow to announce the sites, including Montgomery's Cavendish home, the lands that surround it including Lovers Lane and the Haunted Woods, and the fictional home of Anne of Green Gables.
Source: The London Free Press

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Shelly
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Post by Shelly » Thu Aug 10, 2006 10:04 pm

That's cool. :)
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Post by Timothy » Mon Aug 14, 2006 5:56 am

It's good to know they won't be tearing these places down and building a mall...

Looks like the MacNeill property was added to the list.


Historic recognition for old Montgomery home
Last Updated Fri, 11 Aug 2006 14:57:57 EDT
CBC News

The national historic site at Cavendish was expanded Friday to include the MacNeill homestead where Lucy Maud Montgomery wrote Anne of Green Gables.

The new designation also includes land surrounding the home where Montgomery lived: Lover's Lane and the Haunted Woods. Senator Don Oliver presided over a formal ceremony in Cavendish.

The MacNeill house is now gone, but the grandson of the MacNeills who raised Montgomery and his wife have developed the site. John and Jenny MacNeill run a small shop selling books and postcards, and give tours.

Montgomery was recognized as a person of historic significance shortly after her death in 1942. She wrote four of her books at the home.

"She said she wrote sitting at her gable window, looking out at the hill fields, and you get a real sense of that down at the site," Jenny MacNeill told CBC News.

The homestead also housed the town post office, which MacNeill said allowed Montgomery to intercept any rejection letters from publishers before anyone else could see them.

Jenny MacNeill will retire this year. (Laura Meader/CBC) "The manuscript for Anne of Green Gables was rejected five times," she said.

"Maybe if she had to be going to a neighbour's kitchen to a post office to be picking up rejections in a small community, she might have given up."

The MacNeills will retire this year, and pass the job of caring for the homestead to their son, the latest of a long line of MacNeills to care for this land, a care now recognized as having national historic importance.

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Post by Timothy » Tue Aug 15, 2006 7:19 am

Tuesday, August 15, 2006

Long overdue recognition of a landmark

All Canadians should know the site where Lucy Maud Montgomery’s creative genius developed and flourished.

By Editorial Staff
The Guardian

The historic-site designation of the land surrounding Lucy Maud Montgomery’s Cavendish home is, as one official put it, a long time coming. As one of Canada’s best known authors, Montgomery herself has been celebrated; but the physical surroundings that gave birth to her fictional legends should also be acknowledged and treasured. The historic-site designation does this. For many Islanders, Lucy Maud is like family. Although the author has been long gone, her spirit lives on not only in her writings and in the beloved fictional characters she created, but in our very midst. We see reminders of Anne Shirley, her most famous character, everywhere we go. We also know well the famed Green Gables House, a portion of the site that was officially designated last week as part of the annual Lucy Maud Montgomery Festival. But the national historic-site designation emphasizes her importance far beyond the shores of her beloved province. Montgomery has given much to Canada through the generations. Apart from blessing us with unforgettable characters — Anne Shirley and Emily Starr — her novels and her journals give us a slice of late 19th century/early 20th century Canada and Prince Edward Island. In her descriptions, we get a glimpse of the family and community life of that period. This is a valuable part of our history. Designating as a national historic site the land where she lived and where she developed her creative genius reminds Islanders of the treasure they have in their midst. And it encourages other Canadians to take pride in this site and in the body of work that flowed from the author who once walked its paths.

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Post by sweetheart » Sat Jan 13, 2007 11:54 am

Thats great news :D
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Georgiana
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Post by Georgiana » Sat Jan 13, 2007 2:31 pm

I agree :D .
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